Montpllier sidings

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22A
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Joined: Wed Oct 09, 2019 11:26 am

Montpllier sidings

Post by 22A » Fri Apr 03, 2020 6:08 pm

When I was a child I remember seeing a loading gauge over he siding at Montpelier.
What was loaded / unloaded there please?
Also, why was the loading gauge needed; were trucks in danger of being loaded too high?

If a train came from Stapleton Road, it would have to stop and reverse into the siding. Trains leaving the siding would be headed for Avonmouth, but if the destination was not there, would trains continue to the Henbury loop to face East?

For younger members of this forum, the siding was where the two caravans in this photo are parked.
https://www.bing.com/images/search?view ... edIndex=99

Andy Kirkham
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Re: Montpllier sidings

Post by Andy Kirkham » Tue Apr 07, 2020 5:40 pm

As it happens I've come across an aerial photo of Montpelier station on the Know Your Place website.

https://maps.bristol.gov.uk/arcgis/rest ... nts/109204

It clearly shows the siding you mention and the loading gauge is visible (as well as the signal box and parts of the station building that were destroyed in the war).

It is apparent that most of the sidings were used for coal, but the one you are interested in is perhaps the one that comes closest to the station building. I think this sort of dock was by the gentry for the transport of their horses and carriages.

I've always suppoed that the purpose of loading gauges was indeed to detect out-of-gauge loads.

22A
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Joined: Wed Oct 09, 2019 11:26 am

Re: Montpllier sidings

Post by 22A » Wed Apr 08, 2020 5:48 pm

Thanks for the reply. It never occurred to me that when the siding was laid, that area would have had gentry with horse drawn carriages.
Broadening the scope of this; Was Redland the only station between Temple Meads and Severn Beach without a siding? I believe Clifton Down had a short one.

the green mile
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Joined: Tue Sep 24, 2019 10:00 am

Re: Montpllier sidings

Post by the green mile » Wed Apr 08, 2020 9:23 pm

I seem to recall a story whereby a 9F 2-10-0 was inadvertently driven across the the not very substantial bridge into the coal sidings followed by some head scratching as to how to get it back out. Does anyone remember the details?

Montpelier was the first location I was taken to watch trains. It was also where I had my first railway job, albeit unofficially. When times were hard back in the 1950's I would go there with dad under cover of darkness. He worked out that he could put his hands through the bars or railings in the coal yard to fill a carrier bag with some lumps for the fire at home. I was the lookout to warn him if anyone was approaching. He is long gone now and I was under the age of criminal responsibility at the time so I can fess up with impunity - I think!

Roy

Andy Kirkham
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Re: Montpllier sidings

Post by Andy Kirkham » Wed Apr 08, 2020 10:45 pm

Redland Station was a late addition to the line, having opened in 1897. It never had any sidings. However I have been told that the adjacent land now occupied by tennis courts was railway property, which raises the possibility that it was intended to lay out a goods yard there.

I don't think Sea Mills ever had goods facilities either.

C2759
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Re: Montpllier sidings

Post by C2759 » Mon Apr 13, 2020 11:17 am

All sorts of odd thoughts occur here:-

- was there never a Port & Pier station at Sea Mills then?
- on the question of why there was a loading gauge at Montpelier, I would have thought there were rules about the provision of loading gauges. I have seen them in locations where only vans were loaded which tends to bear out the idea that the requirement was that anywhere anything was loaded required a loading gauge even if, as with loads entirely inside a railway vehicle, there was no possibility of it being out of gauge.
- Montpelier station is listed in the RCH Handbook of Stations dated 1956 as being able to handle goods, passenger, parcels and miscellaneous traffic together with furniture vans, carriages, motor cars, portable engines, machines on wheels, horse boxes, prize cattle vans as well as carriages and motor cars by passenger or parcels trains. This is a bit fascinating; I assume a motor car would have to be loaded onto a wagon in the goods yard somehow - is there a ramp? Having loaded it, the book says it can go by passenger train. How did they do that? Did they stop a passing branch passenger train for 20 minutes while the engine came off and attached the wagon or what?

22A
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Re: Montpllier sidings

Post by 22A » Mon Apr 13, 2020 11:21 am

C2759 wrote:
Mon Apr 13, 2020 11:17 am
Did they stop a passing branch passenger train for 20 minutes while the engine came off and attached the wagon or what?
It struck me as odd that to collect from or deliver a wagon to the sidings, a train would have to come from Stapleton Road and then set back from the main into the yard. Or was there a cross over that I don't remember that could be used by trains coming from Redland?

22A
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Joined: Wed Oct 09, 2019 11:26 am

Re: Montpllier sidings

Post by 22A » Mon Apr 13, 2020 2:34 pm

C2759 wrote:
Mon Apr 13, 2020 11:17 am
All sorts of odd thoughts occur here:-

- was there never a Port & Pier station at Sea Mills then?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_Mills_railway_station
The station was opened in 1865 by the Bristol Port Railway and Pier, and had a single platform. It later became part of the Clifton Extension Railway, and had a second platform built.
The station was opened on 6 March 1865 when services began on the Bristol Port Railway and Pier (BPRP), a self-contained railway which ran along the north bank of the River Avon to a deep water pier on the Severn Estuary at Avonmouth. The route was 4 ft 8 1⁄2 in (1,435 mm) standard gauge single track, with Sea Mills initially the first station along the line.
A south-facing goods siding was provided, but the station mostly dealt with passengers and parcels.

22A
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Joined: Wed Oct 09, 2019 11:26 am

Re: Montpllier sidings

Post by 22A » Sun Jul 19, 2020 10:41 am

Another question about Montpelier please.
The platform used by trains headed towards Stapleton Road was of standard length. The Avonmouth bound platform though was much longer and stretched all the way to the tunnel.
Why was such a long platform required?

Andy Kirkham
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Joined: Wed Sep 25, 2019 12:44 pm

Re: Montpllier sidings

Post by Andy Kirkham » Sun Jul 19, 2020 5:23 pm

Gerry Nichols of the Bristol Railway Circle told me the down platform was extended during the First World War to accommodate longer trains for the large number employed on war work at Avonmouth. Possibly the war came to an end before work began on the Up platform.

Gerry also told me that such were the numbers of workers being transported that a plan was considered to operate both tracks simultaneousy in the same direction - towards Avonmouth in the morning and towards Bristol in the evening.

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